AVAILABLE OCTOBER 6, 2014

From 1815 to 1865, as city blocks encroached on farmland to accommodate Manhattan's exploding population, prosperous New Yorkers developed new ideas about what an urban environment should contain--ideas that poorer immigrants resisted. As Catherine McNeur shows, taming Manhattan came at the cost of amplifying environmental and economic disparities

Nearly two centuries before the Occupy Movement, New Yorkers rich and poor clashed over what shape their young city should take. In this superb history, McNeur recovers the bitter battles over feral hogs and untamed dogs, public parks, safe and pure food, effective sanitation, and the fate of the underclass. Making a safer and cleaner city for some, she concludes, also created a shadow city of poverty and filth for others. Taming Manhattan is a thrilling, vivid expedition into Gotham’s wild and often violent past.
— Matthew Klingle, author of Emerald City: An Environmental History of Seattle